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WordPress 3.0.5 and 3.1-RC4 Released

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February 8th, 2011
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WordPress, WordPress News, WordPress Security

WordPress 3.0.5 and 3.1-RC4 have been released.

Both releases address three security issues and add additional security enhancements, and 3.1-RC4 fixes “about two dozen additional bugs.”

Both updates are available immediately via your Dashboard, but users updating to 3.0.5 will need to update to the latest release of Akismet again. Core developer Andrew Nacin hopes to minimize “the Akismet update dance” in WordPress 3.1 and put an end to it in WordPress 3.2.

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Comments

  1. quicoto (39 comments.) says:

    Updated my sites already :)

  2. Tim Griffin (2 comments.) says:

    Looking forward to bowing out of the Akismet upgrade dance – Go Nacin!
    And, not to mention really happy we’re getting close to the 3.1 stable release/new features!

  3. jive (7 comments.) says:

    Why would they fix 3.1 for php4 compatibility? Seems a waste to me.

  4. Rado (2 comments.) says:

    Already upgraded to WP 3.0.5 and also Akismet Plugin Version 2.5.3 for but cannot wait for the new coming up WordPress 3.1 public release. Can’t wait for using its new features!

  5. anto (1 comments.) says:

    Guys, take it easy upgrading your wp… I completely distroyed my theme…

  6. Dave Smith (2 comments.) says:

    It would be nice if they would also indicate that TwentyTen is about to be updated. I know all are supposed to back up their theme, especially if they are using TwentyTen, but incremental updates coming as fast as 3.0.5 did after 3.0.4 didn’t seem to be the place that all the files in TwentyTen would be updated.

    I know it caught a lot of casual users with small tweaks to their site, (That don’t know how to build a child theme) got caught in this last update.

    At least a mention in the release notes of changes to TwentyTen would be a reminder to many.

    • James Huff (184 comments.) says:

      And that’s exactly why the core developers recommend creating a Child Theme instead of editing a core theme.

      With a child theme, your modifications won’t be affected when the core theme is updated, and your child theme will inherit all of the bug fixes and enhancements.

      • Dave Smith (2 comments.) says:

        James,

        I agree, but it isn’t easy. I’ve been two weeks trying to decipher how to get a functioning functions.php file for a TwentyTen Child theme. The documentation is cryptic, and what I’ve sound out there doesn’t work.

        Something as simple as changing the size of the header image file should be easy and easily documented. But it isn’t.

        Every thing I’ve found so far on doing this hasn’t worked. And I’ve tried about every post out there, but still get the errors on headers already being loaded and the not pluggable issue.

        So to at least get their site working till they can try and find an answer they modify the functions.php file on the parent them TwentyTen.

        Granted, all the other files are straight forward to put in a child theme, but the functions.php file (ex. adding additional widget areas, and something as simple as changing the header image dimensions shouldn’t take weeks to try and figure out)



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