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What Is WordCamp?

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January 29th, 2008
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WordCamp is a conference type of event that focuses squarely on everything WordPress. Everyone from casual end users all the way up to core developers show up to these events. These events are usually highlighted by speeches or keynotes by various people. For example, WordCamp Dallas will feature the following speakers

  • Matt Mullenweg on WordPress 2.5 and Beyond
  • 45 Ways To Power Up Your Blog by John Pozadzides
  • How to prevent, detect and stop content theft by Jonathan Bailey
  • Cali Lewis and Neal Campbell
  • C’mon, Let’s Talk! Building influence and interaction with blogging by Liz Strauss
  • WordPress Power Tips by Lorelle Van Fossen
  • SEO For Bloggers by Chris Smith
  • Aaron Brazell
  • A panel of people to discuss the business of blogging: Mark Ghosh, Liz Strauss, and Aaron Brazell
  • Testing With WordPress by Jacob Santos

WordCamp is a spin off from the popular BarCamp which was a spin off of FooCamp. Each one of these events are smaller in nature when compared to your particular conference, but they are usually focused on a particular subject. So what can you expect when you attend a WordCamp event? Based on the numerous amounts of videos and photos taken from attendees, you can expect a whole lot of fun in an atmosphere that promotes social interaction.

The first WordCamp conference was held in July of 2006 in San Francisco. Matt Mullenweg pulled this event together in only three weeks time and ended up with about 300 people in the Swedish American Hall. The first international WordCamp event was held in Beijing China on September 1st, 2007. However, not too many people knew of the event. So the first KNOWN international WordCamp event took place in Israel on October 25, 2007. Since then, there have been WordCamps all across the world including Hamburg, Melbourne and soon to be Dallas.

You don’t have to be an expert to show up to WordCamp. In fact, the majority of folks are casual end users/fans of the open source software. The conference is great but what happens at the local pubs after a day of speeches is even better, or so I’ve heard. If you want to learn more about WordPress from those who practically have it within their bloodline, do yourself a favor and purchase a ticket and show up. You’ll be glad you did!

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  1. JimmY (1 comments.) says:

    Nice post.. Think i will watch at the records ;))

  2. one good naysayer (3 comments.) says:

    WordCamp sounds great but it would be nice if someone organized one on the East Coast. Philly, NY, DC or somewhere thereabouts.

  3. Johan (1 comments.) says:

    Great initiative! But I’m afraid we have still a long way to go here in the Netherlands before power of WordPress will be recognized, and a trip to San Francisco isn’t an option either ;( So I suppose it will be just reading blog posts about the event..

  4. Pavan Podila (1 comments.) says:

    Great news! … When is it planned ? More details about venue, time, etc..please

  5. Nick says:

    Impressions from Europe’s first WordCamp that took place in Hamburg during the last weekend.


  6. Dodgypress (2 comments.) says:

    Sydney Needs a Word Camp Big Time…

    When is Matt Coming

  7. Jeffro2pt0 (164 comments.) says:

    I believe Charles Stricklin, host of the WordPress Podcast, will be doing a segment with Lorelle about what it takes to organize an event such as this. I think that will be interesting and helpful at the same time.

  8. Sue @ TameBay (1 comments.) says:

    WordCamp London, anyone?

  9. David (1 comments.) says:

    In this day and age, why cannot this be done virtually? Why the need to actually fly to Dallas. There’s this thing called the internet and apparently it is great for connecting people who are not geographically close. Just saying.

  10. BobWms says:

    David, It’s difficult to get a beverage through my connection….the contacts get sticky and it is hard to “rub elbows” but I agree with you. I sure appreciate the podcasts from the previous ones.

  11. Charles Stricklin (11 comments.) says:

    We’re encouraging people all around the world to organize meetups and WordCamps like this. I intend to one day sit down and write a post or series of posts detailing how I put WordCamp Dallas together including things to watch out for, etc.

    They’re really intended to be local events, but I’m fortunate to be attracting speakers from all over the country and attendees from all over the country as well.

    As for David’s suggestion of a Virtual WordCamp, half the fun is meeting someone whose blog you’ve been reading for months or years and sharing dinner or drinks with after the sessions are over (or in some cases, while they’re going on.)

    Speaking of which, we’re planning a get-together the Friday night previous (sponsored by Automattic) and another one Saturday night by a yet-undetermined sponsor. (Would your company like to sponsor that? Contact me!) Both venues are as-of-yet undetermined.

  12. Jeffro2pt0 (164 comments.) says:

    Awesome Charles. Good thing I’ll be getting in early on Friday :) I also agree that the best thing about WordCamp is getting to meet the person behind the blog. I’ve been thinking about how anyone is going to know who I am at this event without wearing a TShirt with my blogging logo on it.

  13. Charles Stricklin (11 comments.) says:

    Nametags! Why do you think we ask you for the name of your company and/or blog?

  14. Jeffro2pt0 (164 comments.) says:

    LOL I like the idea of WEARING my blog personally. But ok, Nametags make sense. I thought you were asking for names and such so you can sell our information to advertisers :)

  15. Lorelle (10 comments.) says:

    A few historical corrections. The first “international” WordCamp was in China, but no news or information was ever heard so most of us think that doesn’t count. Therefore, the first known international WordCamp as in WordCamp Israel on October 25, 2007, and I was there. :D

    I’m really looking forward to WordCamp Dallas. It’s going to be fantastic. And I’m ready for WordCamps EVERYWHERE.

  16. AsceticMonk (5 comments.) says:

    Great post! However, I feel compelled to point out that the first international WordCamp took place in Beijing, China in September. Here is my English post talking about the schedule of the event.

    Matt actually delivered a belated greeting to all Chinese WP users.

  17. Jeffro2pt0 (164 comments.) says:

    @Lorelle and AsceticMonk I apologize for the inaccurate data. I pulled that information from the Wikipedia article about Matt Mullenweg http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matt_Mullenweg and it was claimed that Argentina was the first international event. However, It looks like even that claim has been edited from the entry. Appropriate changes to the article have been made.

  18. AsceticMonk (5 comments.) says:

    Thank Jeff for correcting your post!

    On another note, regarding the information of WordCamp in Beijing, I disagree that no news or information was heard after the event. From what I know, since I am affiliated with the community primarily in charge of the event, a lot of photos and posts were published after the event. Chinese bloggers gave honest suggestions on how to improve WordCamp in the future. In addition, all the slides of the talks are hosted on the official site of WordCamp 2007 Beijing.

    Perhaps, the reason you don’t hear about it is because many information published were in Chinese.

  19. Michael Werner (1 comments.) says:

    Orlando Wordcamp anyone? I’d be happy to help in organizing, maybe providing some space (depending on size), etc.

    Let me know.

  20. Tony Scott (6 comments.) says:

    Sue @ TameBay (WordCamp London, anyone?) – I’m pulling together views on a possible WordCamp UK http://tonyscott.org.uk/2008/0.....-proposal/

  21. Paul Pajo (1 comments.) says:

    We’re organizing the first ever WordCamp in the Philippines! It’s happening in less than a week’s time! http://philippines.wordcamp.org/

  22. Oaddy (1 comments.) says:

    See u, Wordcamp Bangkok 2008 soon!!
    ^___^

  23. Voos Baratos (1 comments.) says:

    Wow, that looks really interesting. I’ve been using WordPress for some time now and I’m really enthusiastic about it. I think it’s a great content management system and in blogging platform, with a great community that develops plug-ins and themes that are free and great! It’s good to see these kinds of initiatives!



Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. […] by WordPress founder, Matt Mullenweg, and has become an international event. Here’s a bit of the history described by the Weblog Tools Collection Blog. The first WordCamp conference was held in July of 2006 in San Francisco. Matt Mullenweg pulled […]

  2. […] Weblog Tools Collection has posted a great rundown of what WordCamp is including some details on what Dallas WordCamp attendees can expect. As WordPress continues to grow in popularity, I expect to see many more WordCamps being created around the world, so if you haven’t attended one already, maybe it is time for you to create one? WordCamp is a spin off from the popular BarCamp which was a spin off of FooCamp. Each one of these events are smaller in nature when compared to your particular conference, but they are usually focused on a particular subject. So what can you expect when you attend a WordCamp event? Based on the numerous amounts of videos and photos taken from attendees, you can expect a whole lot of fun in an atmosphere that promotes social interaction. […]

  3. […] Saturday, March 29th and Sunday, March 30th a lot of WordPress users and coders will be gathering at the George A. Purefoy Municipal Center at 6101 Frisco Square Boulevard in Frisco, Texas, North of Dallas along the Dallas North Tollway to participate in that area’s first WordCamp. […]

  4. […] by WordPress founder, Matt Mullenweg, and has become an international event. Here’s a bit of the history described by the Weblog Tools Collection Blog. The first WordCamp conference was held in July of 2006 in San Francisco. Matt Mullenweg pulled […]

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  7. […] What Is WordCamp? – After being contacted via email by a few people asking me what WordCamp was, I decided to do a small writeup that describes what the event is, how it started and what to expect. WordCamp is a conference type of event that focuses squarely on everything WordPress. Everyone from casual end users all the way up to core developers show up to these events. These events are usually highlighted by speeches or keynotes by various people. […]

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  9. […] news came out a couple of days later as to the possibility of hosting the country’s first WordCamp. I’m giddy to go but perhaps it’s better if I douse my hopes a bit just in case it […]

  10. […] What is WordCamp? WordCamp is a conference type of event that focuses squarely on everything WordPress. Everyone from casual end users all the way up to core developers show up to these events. These events are usually highlighted by speeches or keynotes by various people. WordCamp is a spin off from the popular BarCamp which was a spin off of FooCamp. – Weblog Tools Collection […]

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  12. […] There still isn’t a preliminary schedule available, but the venue has been confirmed: one of Sun Microsystems office’s in Midtown. Convenient. Unsure of what WordCamp actually was, I read Jeff’s appropriately titled post, What is WordCamp? […]

  13. […] WordCamps are conferences for bloggers and I am delighted that Portland will be hosting one on September 27, 2008. These conferences are designed for new bloggers, active bloggers and blogging pros. Designed to promote networking and the exchange of information, these conferences put an emphasis on fun. The day tends to have a variety of structured workshops to choose from while the evening has loosely structured “unconferences”. This provides an opportunity for bloggers decide and discuss topics at whim. […]

  14. […] having one of these crazy WordCamp thingies here in Portland at the end of September… September 27th to be exact. So… if […]

  15. […] – which is exactly what it sounds like. And, while unconferences such as BarCamp, PodCamp and WordCamp are impressive, I’m talking about a bona fide technology […]

  16. […] and any other help that you can provide. If you are a WordPress enthusiast, have never been to a WordCamp before and are from the Chicagoland area, this is your […]

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