‘Web Ethics’ Category

The XHTML wars

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by
on
June 18th, 2004
in
Web Design, Web Ethics, XHTML Tips

While validating this blog (as XHTML 1.0 Strict, mind you) I was reading through some of the banter between the w3c and various XHTML fanatics while reading through a comment left on pictorialis by another XHTML fanboy. The fanboy had a loud mouth, was wrong in his assumptions and just looked really moronish in his assertions. In spite of that idiot, what the heck is wrong with the standards people? Take the work of w3c for example. They make standards which are too hard for end users to understand (P3P), standards which are too brittle for the real world (XHTML 2.0) and standards which developers can’t be bothered with (XHTML Basic) (quote: mpt). This is, of course, the view of a usability guru. There are various other opinions littering the web ranging from “XHTML and DTDs are the *only* future of the web” to hate and scorn for XHTML types. […]

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Comparing RSS 2.0 and ATOM – For the Rest of Us!

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on
June 2nd, 2004
in
Web Design, Web Ethics

After a spirited and extremely helpful discussion on the #wordpress channel on irc.freenode.net, I decided to write something up about Atom and RSS 2.0 and why the world is coming to an end because IE does not support application/xhtml+xml. I am no-one but a simple blogger and coder trying to understand the nuances of stupid tech wars between entrenched gurus and this is a feeble attempt at helping others like me understand the concepts better. Thanks to Michel and Anne for their help in getting me started. I will directly quote them both. To begin with, in 10 words or less, why is Atom better than RSS? Well, because it is the same as semantic HTML (Atom) versus tag-soup (RSS). Now “tag soup” is a term that is used often and without remorse. Basicallty tag soup is markup that will not validate or synctactically incorrect usage of markup. So how […]

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To RSS or not to RSS, that is the question

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responses
by
on
April 14th, 2004
in
Web Design, Web Ethics

I have long pondered this question and have come to some conclusions on my own. RSS is powerful and very light on bandwidth usage. Aggregation is very effective, simple to use and can be used to gather tons of information with very little processing power and bandwidth. However, there are some weaknesses of RSS which come to mind. RSS is a text based protocol and the design of the site, the aesthetics and the overall experience is muted. Visiting this site and browsing the various features and comments (etc.) cannot be replaced by an RSS feed. I personally use RSS to see if there is any new and relevant information on a blog or site that I frequent and then I visit the site to check it out for myself. So RSS, for me is more about prospecting than it is about aggregating. Many of the newer mutlimedia blogs are […]

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How to Increase Your ReaderShip…

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by
on
March 30th, 2004
in
Blogging News, Web Design, Web Ethics

Dave Pollard explains “Top 5 ways to improve your blog” and “Top 5 ways to attract more attention to it”. Makes some very interesting points. Find the article at: http://blogs.salon.com/0002007/2004/03/23.html#a674

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Internet Explorer 7 (!!)

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by
on
March 14th, 2004
in
Blogging News, Code, Web Ethics

This is a direct quote from dean.edwards.name/IE7/intro/ compliance patch! This is an attempt to make Microsoft Internet Explorer more compliant when it comes to web standards. Web developers are becoming increasingly frustrated at the lack of convergence of the major browser vendors. We need a level playing field! CSS is a powerful technology. Many of it’s more advanced features go unused by web developers because of Explorer’s poor support of CSS standards. IE7 provides support for most of the important CSS enhancements. A full list is available on the compatibility page. Thought I would blog about it. Some people could really use it!

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Comment SPAM? Answer: Comment moderation in WordPress 1.0

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responses
by
on
January 7th, 2004
in
Web Ethics

Comment moderation in WP 1.0 is a giant step in the direction of reducing comment spam. I had used a manual method of weeding out comment spam (by going through all comments long after they were posted and had made some damage) for some time, but WP 1.0 takes it one step further. With comment moderation turned on, a message is posted above the comments, which tells the readers that moderation is turned on and the comments posted will not show up on the blog until it is approved by the admin of the blog (which is a deterrent to comment spam by itself). Every time a comment is posted on your blog, you get an email notification (which can be turned on or off) to approve the comment that is posted. You can approve or delete comments by bulk or singly. I envision checking my blog once a day […]

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It is illegal to collect personal information from people under the age of 13

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responses
by
on
December 21st, 2003
in
Web Ethics

Because of the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, also known as C.O.P.P.A. (or COPPA), it’s illegal to collect personal information from people under the age of 13. This means it’s very important to verify the age of anyone who enters such information into your Web site, but the problem with verifying ages is that the verification properties change every day because we get older every day. Here’s a little function that’s written in PHP and will dynamically check user age input in real time and let you know if you are within the law to collect information about this user. I’ve used this particular piece of code for a few years and it’s a great toolbox piece when you’re collecting user information on your website because it keeps you legal! < ?php /* Name: coppa_check($day, $month, $year) Author: Jason DeFillippo Description: This is a down and dirty COPPA age verifier. […]

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