Posts Tagged ‘troubleshooting’

WordPress and the Lost Password

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May 2nd, 2011
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WordPress, WordPress Troubleshooting

So, you’re on your way to write you latest blog masterpiece, but are shocked to find out that you can no longer log in to your WordPress blog. The password isn’t “password” like you had remembered, and the piece of paper that you wrote it on was washed with your pants last week. What can you do? The easiest way to reset your password is with the “Lost your password?” link under your blog’s log in form. This will send a password reset email to the email address in your user profile, so be sure to keep that up to date. What if the email never arrives, or you’ve lost access to the email address in question? Fortunately, there are plenty of alternative ways to reset your password covered in this Codex article. Most hosting providers offer phpMyAdmin via their control panel, and I have often found the phpMyAdmin method […]

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WordPress and the Generic Home Page

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February 15th, 2011
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WordPress, WordPress Troubleshooting

So, you’ve just installed WordPress for the very first time, but you still see your hosting provider’s default “coming soon” page. Two things could be at play here, but they are fortunately very easy to resolve. More than likely, there is an index.html or home.html file in the same directory as the WordPress index.php file. Remove the index.html or home.html file, either via FTP or your hosting provider’s file manager, and all should be fine. If that didn’t help, your server isn’t configured to recognize index.php as a valid index file, which is thankfully very rare. Access your server via FTP and try adding this to the top of your .htaccess file with a plain text editor: DirectoryIndex index.php index.html index.htm Both of these should work to cure your generic home page woes, but if they do not, stop by the WordPress Support Forums for further assistance.

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WordPress General Troubleshooting

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October 14th, 2010
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WordPress, WordPress Troubleshooting

Like any web platform, application, or operating system, WordPress can be hit by sudden unexpected problems. Fortunately, general troubleshooting is easy and will usually reveal the source of (and sometimes fix) most problems. Before we continue to general troubleshooting, there are a few popular cases that have relatively specific fixes. If you’re seeing a blank white screen, consult WordPress and the White Screen of Death. If you’re seeing “Fatal error: Allowed memory size,” consult WordPress and the Fatal Memory Error. If you’re seeing an internal server error or error 500, consult WordPress and the Internal Server Error. And, if you’re seeing a headers already sent warning, consult WordPress and the Headers Already Sent Warning. As you can probably guess from the articles linked to above, many sudden WordPress problems can be traced back to plugins, themes, or corrupt core files. If your problem is not directly related to one of […]

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WordPress and the Headers Already Sent Warning

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September 16th, 2010
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WordPress, WordPress Troubleshooting

The scenario begins like any other troubleshooting scenario. You’ve just installed a plugin or theme on your WordPress blog, modified a file, or you’re simply checking on your blog. Suddenly, an error message just like the following looms over the page you’re viewing like a dark cloud. Warning: Cannot modify header information – headers already sent by (output started at /path/blog/wp-config.php:34) in /path/blog/wp-login.php on line 42 Remember the first rule in troubleshooting, don’t panic! First, you need to interpret the error message. Offhand, it would seem as if line 42 of the wp-login.php file was the source of the problem, but that’s a common misconception. In fact, the problem is on line 34 of the wp-config.php file, and line 42 of the wp-login.php file is just the victim. Now that you know where to look, what do you look for? Believe it or not, this problem is usually caused by […]

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WordPress and the Internal Server Error

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September 10th, 2010
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WordPress, WordPress FAQs, WordPress Troubleshooting

Internal server errors, aka Error 500, can happen under WordPress just as often as they happen under practically anything else running on a server. You may think that the error itself will tell a tech all they need to know, but it really doesn’t say anything. In fact, internal server errors are the server equivalent of a patient explaining to a doctor, “I did something and now I don’t feel well.” Before you ask for support, internal server errors are often caused by plugin or theme function conflicts, so you should start by manually resetting all of your plugins and your theme, which we already covered in WordPress and the White Screen of Death. If that doesn’t resolve the issue, it’s possible that a .htaccess rule could be the source of the problem. To check for this, access your server via FTP or SFTP and rename the .htaccess file. If […]

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WordPress and the Fatal Memory Error

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August 29th, 2010
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WordPress, WordPress Troubleshooting

Remember the old days when your computer would crash because you were running too many applications simultaneously? Well, you might be surprised to know that WordPress can fall victim to the very same thing. You see, your server may be packed with 4 GB of RAM, but that doesn’t mean that all 4 GB have been allocated to PHP on your account. In fact, most decent hosting providers only allocate 32 MB to PHP under each account. Now, most WordPress installations with a good amount of plugins will run fine under 32 MB, but there’s always a chance that one more plugin or one seemingly innocent admin panel task (like exporting or importing posts) may put you over the edge, and you’ll see either a blank screen or the infamous error which starts off something like “Fatal error: Allowed memory size of 33554432 bytes exhausted.” If you see a blank […]

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Common WordPress Multisite Problems and Solutions

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August 19th, 2010
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WordPress, WordPress Troubleshooting

When WordPress 3 launched on June 17th of 2010, the ability to run a multisite network from a single installation quickly became one of the most talked about features. Formerly known as WordPress MU, this entirely separate WordPress project was simultaneously upgraded and merged with the main WordPress branch. Many were expecting WordPress Multisite to carry with it the usual WordPress simplicity, but there’s quite a bit more to do after WordPress’ famous 5-minute installation when creating a multisite network, and the complexities of the network system have led to some confusion and questions along the way. Andrea Rennick became a user of WordPress MU about three years ago, when it was still in a pre-beta stage. She was just your typical stay at home mom and teacher, and she wanted to create a community where other homeschoolers could have their own blogs all in one location, so they could […]

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WordPress and the White Screen of Death

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August 17th, 2010
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WordPress, WordPress Troubleshooting

Nothing can be more unsettling than an obvious problem with absolutely no error or diagnostic message, and that’s exactly what the infamous white screen of death is. Imagine that you were changing a setting on your blog, installing or upgrading a plugin, upgrading to the latest version of WordPress, or simply returning to your blog at the start of a new day, and you see nothing but white. Unfortunately, the white screen of death became all too well-known in the WordPress community when a few incompatible plugins began to cause the issue after users upgraded to WordPress 3. Today, most white screens of death are either caused by plugins or themes (theme functions can sometimes interfere with core WordPress functions). If you want to immediately attempt to find the culprit, you can enable debug mode, but even that can produce nothing more than a blank screen, so why not attack […]

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