‘WordPress Security’ Category

Photo Album Plugin Vulnerabilities

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on
February 21st, 2008
in
WordPress Plugins, WordPress Security

S@BUN is at it again, this time, reporting multiple SQL Injection Vulnerabilities within the Photo Album plugin for WordPress. According to the security bulletin: Multiple vulnerabilities have been identified in Photo Album (plugin for WordPress), which could be exploited by remote attackers to execute arbitrary SQL queries. These issues are caused by input validation errors in the “wppa.php” script when passing user-supplied parameters (e.g. “photo” or “album”) to certain functions (e.g. “wppa_album_name()” or “wppa_photo_name()”), which could be exploited by malicious people to conduct SQL injection attacks. Multiple security advisory services places this round of vulnerabilities as a Moderate Risk. For example, FrSIRT describes the Moderate risk as being: Remotely and locally exploitable flaws, which could lead to denial of Service or privilege escalation. Versions 1.1 and prior of this plugin are vulnerable. As always, it is recommended that you disable this plugin until a patch for it is released. [EDIT] […]

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ModSecurity, WordPress Admin and “Method Not Implemented”

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responses

I battled this one for a little bit and I hope the information here helps someone. First and foremost, there are various version of this problem and they might have different causes stemming from the same source. I list them here in no particular order. I found all the topics starting with a search for the dreaded “Method Not Implemented” 501 error code from the admin panel of WordPress. POST to /test/wp-admin/index-extra.php not supported: This error is also noticed on post.php and theme-editor.php. Now there are various WordPress Forum posts providing somewhat workable solutions to the problem. I tried some of the solutions but either they did not work for me (I had not looked that closely at the error before trying them) or they were too broad and I did not care for the results. There is some finger pointing in both the forums and the various other pages […]

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2 Plugin Security Bulletins

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on
February 7th, 2008
in
WordPress Plugins, WordPress Security

NBBN has discovered some cross site scripting vulnerabilities for the WP-Footnotes plugin version 2.2 for WordPress. Input passed to the “pre_footnotes”, “priority”, “post_footnotes”, and “style_rules” array elements in the “wp_footnotes_current_settings[]” array in the admin_panel.php script is not properly sanitised before being returned to the user. This can be exploited to execute arbitrary HTML and script code in a user’s browser session in context of an affected site. The good news this time around is that, ‘register_globals‘ must be turned on for exploitation to occur. If you are using this plugin on your site, it is advised that you disable the plugin until a security patch has been released. According to the security bulletin, the solution is to edit the plugin source code to ensure that input is properly sanitized. Again, if you know that your webserver has register_globals turned off, you are in the clear. S@BUN has reported an “id” […]

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2in1 Security Bulletin

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responses
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on
January 31st, 2008
in
WordPress Security

Today, we have a moderately critical SQL Injection Vulnerability that was discovered by HouSSaMix in the “WP-Cal” plugin version 0.x for WordPress. According to the Secunia Advisory: Input passed to the “id” parameter in functions/editevent.php is not properly sanitised before being used in SQL queries. This can be exploited to manipulate SQL queries by injecting arbitrary SQL code. Users with a malicious intent can conduct SQL injection attacks which may result in the retrieval of usernames, password hashes, and email addresses for users and administrators. However, the malicious user must have knowledge of the database table prefix. So far, version 0.3 has been confirmed as having this vulnerability with other versions possibly being affected. Secunia states that the solution involves editing the source code to ensure that input is properly sanitised. Click here to read the original advisory which provides an example of the exploit as well as the vulnerable […]

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Permalinks Migration Vulnerability

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on
January 25th, 2008
in
WordPress Plugins, WordPress Security

According to an advisory released by Packetstorm, a fellow by the name of g30rg3_x has discovered two bugs within Dean’s Permalinks Migration Plugin version 1.0. The first bug relates to XSRF and can allow an attacker to force a user to perform an unsolicited action that when combined with an XSS bug that has also been discovered, allows the attacker to gain valid credentials. g30rg3_x actually provides a detailed explanation into the problem: Since the variable $dean_pm_config[‘oldstructure’] its not correctly sanitized (when retrieving), this allow any user to store/save “malicious code” inside the database and later be injected this “malicious code” when the data is retrieved. Using the XSRF as a “combo” we can create crafted pages that will force users to conduct this injection and steal some valid credentials to the WordPress based CMS. g30rg3_x has tried to contact the author of the plugin but has not had any […]

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Matt Cutts On Securing WP

19
responses
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on
January 22nd, 2008
in
LinkyLoo, WordPress Security

Matt Cutts has published an article which highlights three different ways to secure your WordPress installation. The first tip involves locking down your Admin directory. Matt configures his .hatccess file so that only his IP address is allowed to access the WP-Admin directory. For the second tip, you should create a blank index.html file to place into your wp-content/plugins directory. Not doing so allows your plugin folder to be wide open, giving nosy people an idea as to what plugins you have installed. Matt’s third and final tip involves subscribing to the official WordPress development blog – http://wordpress.org/development/feed/ As we should all know by now, this is the best way to stay up to date. Matt also offers a bonus tip where he suggest removing the line of code within your header.php file that publishes your WordPress version. All of these are excellent tips. But what do you do to […]

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WP-Forum Plugin Security Bulletin

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on
January 21st, 2008
in
WordPress Plugins, WordPress Security

If you are currently using the latest release of the WP-Forum plugin, listen up. The websec security team has discovered a vulnerability within this plugin that can be exploited by malicious users to conduct SQL injection attacks. According to Secunia: Input passed to the “user” parameter in the WordPress installation’s index.php script (when “forumaction” is set to “showprofile” and “page_id” to a page with the “<!–WPFORUM–>” tag) is not properly sanitised before being used in SQL queries. This can be exploited to manipulate SQL queries by injecting arbitrary SQL code. This vulnerability when exploited successfully allows the individual to retrieve usernames, password hashes, and email addresses for all users, including administrators. However, the user has to have knowledge of the proper database table prefix. This vulnerability has been confirmed in version 1.7.4 which is currently the most recent version available for download. Description: WP-Forum is a WordPress plugin that enables […]

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ModSecurity and WordPress

6
responses
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on
November 1st, 2007
in
Blogging News, WordPress Security

Daniel Cuthbert has written a paper on ModSecurity and WordPress. While I praise the work and the effort, I am not sure why they did not find it in themselves to protect the PDF document that they are distributing using some sort of an SHA1 checksum or the like to ensure the integrity of the download. Now I know that these guys know what they are doing but I have a problem with security related papers, help documents, scripts and other items when they cannot be verified with the source and the source itself cannot be verified with the original author of the product. I have always been a big proponent of mod_security and I think it provides a comprehensive layer of web security without as much overhead. Although I have never thought of WordPress’ security to be as weak as the BlogSecurity folks have claimed it to be. mod_security […]

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