‘brainstorming’ Category

1000 things I’ve learned about blogging from OJB

23
responses

1000 things I’ve learned about blogging from the Online Journalism Blog.: An interesting and long-ish list of lessons that the author (I could not figure out who wrote this article from their list of authors. I am assuming it was Paul Bradshaw. Multi-author blogs really, really need to think about adding the name of the author to their templates/themes.) has learned from blogging. Some of them are absolute gems such as “First knowledge, then analysis, then ideas” and “A blog without comments is broken“. More food for thought would come from the conversations surrounding such a list. I will add one of my own. If you consider others’ opinions, you will have involved and returning readers. What have you learned about blogging?

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WordPress 2.7 Plugin Uninstall Methods

5
responses

WordPress 2.7 Plugin Uninstall Methods: A tutorial from Jacob Santos on the WordPress 2.7 Plugin Uninstall functionality and how to use it to make the uninstall process easy and seamless. Jacob adds a note to all plugin authors that I believe is worth mentioning: Special care then should be taken when using this method to ensure that your plugin isn’t doing anything it shouldn’t when uninstalling. In other words, please be careful and do not break other plugins and/or the core.

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Chronological Order of Comments on a Post

25
responses

I never get this right. There are times when I will be reading a post and it feels as if the chronological order of comments would make better sense. At other times, such as the comments on this post on IP Democracy (which has newest comments on top), seems opposite. I actually found it quite difficult and counter intuitive to read through the comments on that post to follow the story as it unfolded. Scrolling upwards on a post is just plain weird. On more popular posts, readers tend to complain when the list of comments grows beyond a certain number and they loose the forest for the trees. The TechCrunch comment threads are simply useless if you want to follow any part of the discussion and I tend to just read the highlighted ones from Michael or the other authors. On the other hand, comment reply threads are unwieldy, […]

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15 Websites and,or Services I’d Actually Pay For

41
responses

15 Websites / Services I’d Actually Pay For Ryan lists fifteen websites/online services he would be willing to pay for, if they were not free. Worthy of note is the following in the list: WordPress.org: The benefit of blogging with WP is so significant (SEO, functionality, flexibility) that it’s well worth paying for. I’d probably pay a $200 for an installation… which makes me realize how much I rely on the product. This is an incredibly interesting line of thought and I am sure a lot of Web 2.0 companies/services would kill to have more user data and input on this. I strongly believe that revenue models and monetization techniques are the stuff that make or break a company in spite of the fantastic idea/concept that it might provide. In that spirit, here is my list of 12 things online (15 things were hard to find quickly) I am willing […]

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The Best and Worst Times to Post

8
responses
by
on
May 2nd, 2008
in
Blogging, brainstorming, LinkyLoo

Want That Post to Go Popular? Here’s The Best and Worst Times to Post It He determined the best days and times for a blog post to be submitted to those sites if its author wants it to receive the maximum number of votes, comments and inbound links. Interesting data and tabulation of said data to determine what is the best and worst time to publish a post. Data is derived from various information collected through aideRSS. I will not steal the original authors’ thunder by posting the answer here but I agree with the numbers for blogs which have a primarily US reader base. If your audience is from across the world (as on this blog), this might not be as relevant.

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Woopra and WordPress: Unofficial Coolness Guide

39
responses
by
on
April 27th, 2008
in
brainstorming, WordPress, WordPress Plugins

Woopra was opened up to the world at the Dallas WordCamp where I met John for the first time. His talk was not on Woopra but he introduced it to the event in a very short, three minute spiel. Since then Woopra has generated a tremendous amount of buzz in blogging circles. In short, Woopra is a stats tool for websites that lives as an application on your desktop (among other places) and can provide live webstats on your visitors. I like it since it is fast and since the developers gave me an opportunity to look at the insides early on, I have developed quite a fondness for it. They are in growth mode and with the recent upgrade to their desktop client, they can support more locations and are in the process of approving a large number of new users for their service. All of that being said, […]

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WordPress on every Google Search?

39
responses
by
on
April 24th, 2008
in
Blogging, brainstorming, WordPress

I had this interesting thought which I am sure can be easily defeated but definitely points towards the success of WordPress. I was searching the web for something inconspicuous as the “iWrap” and I came upon some interesting results. While browsing the results and then switching back to the search results page, I realized that the first page had at least three results that were either related to WordPress or were on a WordPress blog. I repeated the search for completely inane search terms and had at least one result show up on every search I performed from a blog that used WordPress as the blogging tool. I have had this happen in the past with various other queries but had not quite put two and two together. So my hypothesis is that a WordPress blog or a link that is somehow related to WordPress, shows up on the first […]

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Who Comments on Blogs, and Why?

126
responses
by
on
March 6th, 2008
in
brainstorming, Business of Blogging

Who Comments on Blogs, and Why?: I realize there is a selection problem here: anyone who responds to my question about why commenters comment is, alas, a commenter. Which means that regular commenters will be overrepresented in the comments — unless, of course, a whole bunch of you who never comment decide to go ahead and log in and, in the comments section, tell us why you never comment. Or why other people do. I love the topic of this post on Freakonomics at the New York Times Blog. There is a lot of food for thought. There are many reasons to leave a comment on a blog and the ability of readers to leave comments on a blog and the instant interaction and conversation that develops, is what attracted me to b2 and consequently WordPress. I tend to not comment on blogs where the comment form is hard to […]

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WordPress.com as OpenCourseWare

14
responses
by
on
February 18th, 2008
in
Blogging News, brainstorming, WordPress

WordPress.com as OpenCourseWare: Link to and discussion of using WordPress.com and consequently WordPress, as a platform for low cost, highly searchable and taggable OpenCourseWare type applications. The example blog is about blogs, wikis and such and might be an interesting read by itself. I have personally used the various iteration of educational CMSs such as WebBoard and WebCT and they have left enough to be desired that I have come running back to my beloved WordPress and bbPress to setup private blogs and forums for use by my classmates. Thanksgoes out to the work done by various educators around the world who are making good use of WordPress and thanks to Stephen for the news.

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